Mobirise

Expression in 3 Forms

13-Jul-2013 to 24-Aug-2013 

A cacophony of three artists in three different forms collide and combine their work into one spectacular exhibit. Glass, paintings and prints from some of Ohio best artists. 

Artist #1 Matthew Paskiet, Glass artist with worldwide recognition

Artist #2 Douglas R. Fiely will be exhibiting his fine printmaking ability using several different techniques and also incorporating color. 

Artist #3 Chelsea Younkman, Demonstrating in large-scale charcoal, stresses of the corporate world. 


 We all are honored to be featuring Matthew Paskiet, a glass artist who studied under and worked for world-famous glass sculptor, Dale Chihuly. Native to "The Glass City", Toledo, Ohio Matt began his study of glassblowing at the Toledo Museum of Art and further pursued the studies at Pilchuck Glass School in Washington State as well as The Centre deVidre in Barcelona, Spain. In addition to assisting Dale Chihuly, Matt has worked with respected glass artist Dino Rosin. After returning home in 2002, Matt opened and operated his glass studio, Firenation Glass Studio and Gallery. Matt enjoys making glass because of the effect it has on people and the response I get whether it's good or not so good. Even if a person may not like it, that means it had an effect on you, it made you think, and it made you form an opinion. Matt's work can be seen regularly at the Toledo Museum of Art and will also be featured at the Fort Wayne Museum of Artthis year. 

Douglas R. Fiely is a diversified artist. Though educated as a printmaker and holding an MFA in the medium, he is also an avid painter. “Recently, 
I’ve witnessed a personal renaissance in painting – a medium in which I struggled as a student. It’s now become as natural as breathing."
Fiely has won numerous local, regional, and national awards dating back to his first juried show in 1969 when he took second place for an intaglio print at Bowling Green University. He has exhibited his slipped carved ceramic work at Wooster’s Functional Ceramics Invitational International Workshop. He is represented in Florida, Ohio, and Connecticut galleries and he has sold works from New York's Fifth Ave. to the mountains of Aspen, Colorado. Operating a home studio and gallery in northwestern Ohio, Fiely remains prolific in a variety of art mediums. His style is spontaneous. He likes relying on chance accidents which open up new doors in the working process

 

  

 

 

The American Dream of owning a home and having finanicial stability has been diminished due to the ever constant recession which has consumed the minds of many Americans over the last 10 years. Some of the effects of the recession such as anxiety, stress, anger and aggression due to bankruptcy, pay cuts, and layoffs has fallen upon many of the corporate business men and women in the American society.

My body of work enables the corporate culture of America to be more accessible to the general population. I feel that the general public has this notion that people who wear suits are intimidating, superior, and unemotional because of what the business suit represents: power, authority and order. My goal is to break down the stereotypical notion of people in suits by using their body language as a vehicle for disorderly emotions. Even the most seemingly powerful, emmaculate businessmen and women are struggling in this challenging economy.

Creating these drawings in a monochromatic charcoal-gray tone enhances the conformity of the corporate attire. The charcoal’s deep range in values against the pristine white backdrop reinforces the anxious emotions displayed by the featured businessman and woman. Taking away the subjects’ environment redirects the viewer’s focus to the gesture, which in turn helps to dramatize the emotions even further. 

 

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